How to Ask for Crochet Help

By Rachel Choi – 8 Comments
Since I’ve been blogging, designing and selling crochet patterns for a while, I’ve had the opportunity to help lots of people with crochet questions. I love helping people if they need it, but I have come across many people who do not know exactly how to ask for help. Here are some tips that I think will be helpful if you would like to ask me or any other crochet designer for crochet help: help

Ask the right person. Every crochet pattern is written by a designer or owned by a person or company. If your pattern is written by me (Rachel Choi) then obviously you should ask me for help. Whoever designed or owns the pattern is the person who you should ask for help, being that he/she would know the most about it.

Indicate exactly what you need help with. The key word here is exactly. Don’t just say you need help, or that you’re confused. Tell the person exactly what section of a row you do not understand. You can even place the instructions that you need help with in quotation marks so the person knows exactly where to help you.

Be quick and to the point. Do not ramble on about who knows what. Be concise. Your message with your question should be 4 sentences or less. If you cannot write it that short, then you’re probably rambling.

Remember to ask the question. Too many times someone would say they need help, but forgets to ask the question. A question, if you remember from grade school has a question mark at the end. It is not a statement telling me how confused you are. If you’re going to ask for help, remember to ask the question.

Crocheting is suppose to be fun, not a pull your hair out experience! If you need help, just ask. Simple as that.

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8 Comments

  1. Candy Myura says:

    Although your blog is focused around crocheting, I wanted to acknowledge your excellent points about the human nature. People struggle to admit weakness. When more people can feel comfortable and have the tools and resources to ask for help, our business and communities will be so much better off.

  2. Linda says:

    I have to totally agree with all the above. But I want to also add the following:

    Be polite. I often get emails asking for help that are just rude! No one is going to help you if you’re not polite. A simple “thanks” at the end would do.

    Do not whine, bitch, or complain. It makes you look immature and ignorant.

  3. Bethintx1 says:

    Well said! As a You Tube crochet instructor, I get lots of comments simply saying “it’s too hard.” or ” I’m confused!” instead of getting to the point. I’m willing to help, but I need the right information to be able to do so. Keep up the good work!

  4. Heather says:

    I may have to link to your post for the college Chemistry courses I teach. The same principles hold true for asking questions of a professor.

  5. Marsha says:

    I have to agree with the be polite comment.

    I’ve worked in customer service and some people just think that they can be rude and nasty and that everyone will just be nice to them back. So if you want help, ask for it nicely and you will be helped very nicely in return. If you ask rudely, then you’re probably going to get a rude comment back. This goes for every industry, including crochet.

  6. Donna says:

    Yes! Exactly what you all said!

    I get asked questions via email a lot and one thing that bothers me is when someone asks a question, then an hr later sends another email with the same question, then another after that. There should be at least a 24hr waiting period for you to let someone answer. Everyone doesn’t sit at their computer the whole day, at least I know I don’t.

    Just my two cents!

  7. Phyllis Belflower says:

    I am starting a project that calls for a steel size 1 crochet hook. I am getting conflicting mm sizes. Can you help me?

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Phyllis, sometimes the US hooks have different mm sizes on them even if they are the same letter size. It can be very confusing! If the pattern you’re using states the letter and the mm size, then I would just pay attention to the mm and not the letter. If it doesn’t tell you what the mm size is, I’m hoping that the pattern has a gauge in it. That way you can get the crochet hook that gives you the proper gauge.

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