How to Read Crochet Patterns

By Rachel Choi – 105 Comments

I bet every crocheter remembers the dreadful first time they read a crochet pattern and had no clue what they were reading. I know for sure that happened to me! Let’s get rid of all that frustration and decrypt crochet patterns once and for all. Here is a basic guide to start reading crochet patterns.

Basic Crochet Abbreviations
For some reason pattern writers are too lazy to spell every word out. So they use abbreviations for just about every single word in the pattern. The master list of crochet abbreviations is always handy, but here are the basics to get started.

Abbreviation
Description
ch chain stitch
ch- refers to chain or space previously made: e.g., ch-1 space
ch-sp chain space, the space made by the chain
dc double crochet
dec decrease/decreases/decreasing
hdc half double crochet
inc increase/increases/increasing
lp(s) loops
MC main color
pm place marker
rep repeat(s)
rnd(s) round(s)
sc single crochet
sk skip
sl st slip sitich
sp(s) space(s)
st(s) stitch(es)
tr treble crochet
yo yarn over

Basic Crochet Symbols
Not only do pattern writers use abbreviations, they also use special symbols. Most symbols are used to indicate what parts of the pattern are to be repeated. Here are the primary ones.

Abbreviation
Description
[ ] work instructions within brackets as many times as directed
( ) work instructions within parentheses as many times as directed
* repeat the instructions following the single asterisk as directed
* * repeat instructions between asterisks as many times as directed or repeat from a given set of instructions

Crochet Syntax
Now that we know basic abbreviations and symbols, lets take some examples and examine them.

Example 1
Row 1: With red, ch 21, turn, sc in second ch from hook, sc in each ch across: 20 sc

This is the first row you are crocheting and you will be using your red colored yarn. Make a chain that is 21 chains long. Then turn you crochet work to work in the opposite direction. Make a single crochet stitch in the second chain from your hook. Then make a single crochet in each of the chains across the row. When you finish this row, you will have made 20 single crochet stitches.
Note: When you count the second chain from your hook. Do not count the loop that is on your hook. The first chain from your hook is the chain right after the loop on your hook. So the second would be the chain after that.

Example 2
Round 1: With Beige, ch 2, 8 sc in second ch from hook, place marker: 8 sc

This is the first round that you will be crocheting and you will use your beige colored yarn. Round means that you will be crochet in a circle shape.

Start by making a chain that is 2 chains long. Remember that the loop on your hook does not count as a one of the chains. Next, make 8 single crochet stitches in the second chain from your hook. Then place a marker. At the end of this round you will have crocheted 8 single crochet stitches.
Note: Markers are used to keep track of where the round ends and a new round begins. When you crochet around a circle, it is very easy to loose track of where to stop and start a new round if you do not use a marker. A marker can be a small scrap piece of yarn. To place a marker, just insert it into the loop that is on your hook. At the end of every round, you should move the marker and put it into the new loop that is on your hook.

Example 3:
Round 5: (2 dc in next dc, dc in next 3 dc) around: 30 dc

This is the fifth round of a crochet project. Make 2 double crochet stitches in the next crochet stitch, which was a double crochet in the previous round. Then make a double crochet stitch in the next 3 stitches. Repeat this all the way around, until you reach the end of this round. You will have completed 30 double crochets in this round.
Note: You will know you reached the end of this round when you reach your marker. For this round, do not crochet in the loop that has the marker in it, stop in the stitch right before it, since the loop with the marker represents the beginning of the next round.

There are unlimited amounts of examples that can be placed here. Even expert crocheters have trouble reading crochet patterns from time to time. Just remember to not get frustrated, and to ask for help when you need it! If you need help with a pattern always ask the designer of the pattern since he/she would know the most about it. If it is one of my Crochet Spot patterns, you can always ask me for help anytime!!! Just leave a comment on the crochet pattern’s post and I’ll be sure to answer.

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105 Comments

  1. Rachel says:

    This is such great information Rachel, thanks for sharing with us! I’ll be linking.

  2. Rachel says:

    My pleasure Rachel! Thanks for linking!

  3. Becki says:

    How helpful!! Thanks for taking the time to explain this at a beginner level.!!!!

  4. cynthia says:

    Hi Rachel, thank you. Cynthia

  5. Rachel says:

    You’re Welcome, Cynthia!

  6. Rufor says:

    Hello,
    Thank you! I would now go on this blog every day!

    Thanks
    Rufor

  7. Rachel says:

    Hi Rufor!

    That’s awesome! I try to add new things everyday!

  8. jennifer says:

    join with sl st in 2nd ch of beg ch-8 ch-2 sp.
    This is what my pattern says I’m trying to move into an intermediate pattern and I cannot figure this out. Can you help?

  9. Rachel says:

    In regular people language, this says: join with a slip stitch in the second chain of the begining chain 8 chain 2 space.

    The chain 8 chain 2 space refers to a space that is created by chaining 8 and chaining 2, which you should have already made, perhaps in a previous round. So you would make a slip stitch in the second chain of the beginning of that space.

    This is a very confusing line! Let me know if that helps any :)

  10. bernice says:

    i want to make a shrug in the pattern it measure 36’xwide14ins deep. the needle size is l gauge is 10 dc and 5 row =4 ins. im 42dd any help would be greatful thank you Bernice Lovett

    • Rachel says:

      Hey Bernice!
      To get started on your shrug the first thing you want to do is make that gauge swatch. To do so here is what you do.
      With your size I hook, make a chain that is 13 chains long
      Then make a double crochet in the forth chain from your hook.
      Then make a double crochet in each chain across, when you reach the end of your chain, you should have a total of 10 double crochets.
      Next, chain 3, turn your work, and make a double crochet in each double crochet across to make the next row.
      Continue this until you have made 5 rows.
      Then measure your swatch to see if it is a 4 inch square.
      If it is, then you’re ready to start making your shrug, else you have to try a different hook size to get the gauge just right.

      Let me know if there is anything in particular you need help with!
      Good luck with your shrug :)

  11. [...] Need help reading the crochet pattern? Learn more about how to read crochet patterns. [...]

  12. Mary says:

    Thank you SOO much Rachel. I am getting better at reading patterns, but your info was the best yet. You are so patient about it all. It is like learning another language, but as it becomes easier, it becomes addictive. I’m finding it to be more fun than frustrating, so I think that is a sign that I am learning and feeling more comfortable…I LOVE your site..it is my favorite..you’re the best

    A very grateful fan…mary

  13. Ami says:

    Hi Rachel,

    Can you please help me interpret this 4 rows?

    Thanks a million!

    Row 2: Ch 3, turn, dc in first st, ch 1, (3 dc in next ch-1 sp, ch 1) 4 times, 2 dc in top of turning ch.
    Row 3: Ch 3, turn, 3 dc in first ch-1 sp, (ch 1, 3 dc in next ch-1 sp) 4 times, dc in top of turning ch.
    Row 4: Ch 1, turn, sc in first st, (ch 5, sc in next ch-1 sp) 4 times, ch 5, sc in top of turning ch.
    Row 5: Ch 5, turn, (sc in next ch-5 sp, ch 5) 4 times, sc in next ch-5 sp, ch 2, dc in last st.

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Ami!

      For row 2, you you going to chain 3, then turn your work to work in the opposite direction. Make a double crochet in the first stitch on the row, then chain 1. On the previous row (row 1) there should be a few places where you made a chain of 1, so in the next chain-one space on the row you are going to make 3 double crochets (meaning place your hook under the chain to make your stitches), then chain one. Do the previous sentence 4 times. Now make 2 double crochets in the top of the turning chain. The turning chain is the last thing on at the end of the row. Put your hook into the top of it to make your stitches.

      For row 3, chain 3, turn, make 3 double crochets in the first chain-1 space. Chain 1, make 3 double crochets in the next chain-1 space. Do the previous sentence 4 times. Make 2 double crochets in the top of the turning chain.

      For row 4, chain 1, turn, single crochet in the first stitch on the row. Chain 5, single crochet in the next chain-1 space. Do the previous sentence 4 times. Chain 5, single crochet in the top of the turning chain.

      For row 5, chain 5, turn. Single crochet in the next chain-5 space, then chain 5. Do the previous sentence 4 times. Single crochet in the next chain-5 space, chain 2, then double crochet in the last stitch on the row.

  14. Ami says:

    Dear Rachel,

    It makes so much of sense now. I really appreciate it!

    I love your site!

    Best,
    Ami

  15. gLADYS HAWRYLUK says:

    Dear Rachel:
    I would like to crochet a simple shell with short sleeves With Hook Q
    Do you have a pattern?
    Thank You,
    GladysHawryluk

  16. roberta hanlon says:

    Hi Rachel,

    I am working on a doily pattern and on several rows it says to shell over shell. I do not know what that means. in this pattern a shell is 2 tr ch3 2 tr in every chain 3 space. next frown Shell over shell for entire row. can you help me out on this one?
    thanks,
    roberta

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Roberta!
      Shell over shell is telling you to make shells on top of the shells on the previous row. So for each shell you have on the previous row, you will make a shell (2 tr, ch 3, 2 tr) in the chain 3 space of the shell on the previous row.
      Let me know if that helps!

  17. Sonya says:

    Thank you for your web site. I just found it and subscribed to it! :) I need a pattern help. I love making Amigurumi animals and part of the pattern goes like this: Row 3-8: Increase of 6 stitches from the previous row (up to 64 stitches in this row). My previous row has 22 stitches. How do I figure out my increase in each row? Hope this makes sense. :) Thanks!

    • Rachel says:

      Hey Sonya, here is what it means written out.

      Row 3: (2 sc in next sc, sc in next 4 sc) across: 28 sc
      Row 4: (2 sc in next sc, sc in next 5 sc) across: 34 sc
      Row 5: (2 sc in next sc, sc in next 6 sc) across: 40 sc
      Row 6: (2 sc in next sc, sc in next 7 sc) across: 46 sc
      Row 7: (2 sc in next sc, sc in next 8 sc) across: 52 sc
      Row 8: (2 sc in next sc, sc in next 9 sc) across: 58 sc
      Row 9: (2 sc in next sc, sc in next 10 sc) across: 64 sc

      Note that the last set of single crochets that you do for each row will not be complete.

  18. Tara says:

    Hi!

    I am trying to make a baby hat but for some reason the hat keeps ending up with extra stitches.
    It calls for me to Chain 2, DC in the same stitch, 2 DC in each DC around (adjustable ring). Slip stitch in second chain the CH2 (16).

    How do I DC in the same stitch? Does (16) mean that there are 16 DC including the chain 2 and DC in the same stitch? Or is it 16 DC because of the 2 DC in each DC around?

    Any assistance would be greatly appreciated. I am anxious to make this hat.

    • Rachel says:

      Hey Tara!
      To dc in the same stitch means to make your dc in the stitch where the chain 2 is sticking out of. The 16 means that there are 16 double crochets in that round. By the way this pattern is written I believe that the chain 2 at the beginning of the round is being counted as a double crochet. So yes, the chain 2 is being counted as part of the 16 stitches.

  19. Tara says:

    Thanks Rachel.

    Here’s my next question for you: The first step of the pattern is to do 8 DC in the adjustable ring. Then Chain 2, Dc in the same stitch, 2 DC in each DC around the ring. (16) If I DC in the same stitch and then 2 DC in each DC around the ring I get 17 stitches. ???? I can’t figure out why my hat is coming up with extra stitches. . . . .

    • Rachel says:

      okay, there’s 8 dc on the first round
      for the second round, you ch 2 (this counts as 1 dc) then dc in the same stitch, now you have 2 dc that are made in the 1 dc from round 1.
      Now there are 7 dc left from round 1. Make 2 dc in each of the dc. That’s 14 dc.
      14 dc plus the first 2 dc equals 16 dc.

  20. Maggi says:

    Now I am even more confused. Here in Britain we call a single crochet a double crochet and so on i.e.one up from the American instructions. A slip stitch is the same thank heavens!
    This means when I download an American pattern (and that is where most of them come from) I have to translate it first.
    I don’t know why the instructions are different, maybe its like driving on the left or the right?
    Happy Crocheting in whatever language, Maggi in UK

  21. What a lovely site you’ve created! May I add to your list?

    sc2tog- single crochet 2 together for a decrease
    fp front post
    fpdc front post double crochet
    bp back post
    bpdc back post double crochet

    You are an inspiration!

  22. Michi says:

    Hey, I’m having trouble with something in a pattern I’m doing, I was wondering if you could help? This is what the pattern says:
    sc in ea of next 3 sc, sc in back loop only of ea of next 14 sc, sc in ea of next 17 sc, sc in back loop only of ea of next 14 sc, sc in ea of next 3 sc
    I’m confused on what ea means. O.o

  23. Pam says:

    Hi Rachel,

    Thank you for your web page. Stumbeled in on it this morning. Thank you for describing the tunisian stitch. I was wondering what it was. Not much for change but do alot of changing in crochet. I tought my self to read patterns. 30 years ago. WOW doesnt seem that long. Yes it was hard, almost put it up and said I cant. but you know I cant never did do anything…
    Now I can read them good. Sometimes get alittle confused but I usually put it down and go get a cup of coffee or a glass of water and sit down and start again or i may not look at it untill later. which ever dont never give up on it ask for help from a neighbor or your Senior Citizens group in your town and they could help and it would make them feel so good. Oh I forgot…
    My question is::::::: On your double crochet tunisian stitch is it the same as regular crochet????

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Pam, the Tunisian double crochet is very similar to the regular double crochet. Here is what you do: yarn over, insert the hook behind the next vertical bar, yarn over, pull up a loop, yarn over, and draw through 2 loops on the hook. Leave the final loop of the stitch on the hook.

  24. hazel says:

    2: ch 3, work 1 dc where chain is (in same st as join – ch3 counts as first dc), 2 dc in each stitch, join with sl st (remember, the ch counts as a st!). [24]

    Its to make a hat. I’m not sure where the 1 dc is. is it on the ch 3?
    When I put 1 dc on the 1st and try 2dc the next st it creates a hole. I don’t know what i’m suppose to do.

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Hazel, you make the “1 dc” in the same stitch that the “ch 3″ is sticking out of. It is not on the ch 3, instead it is next to it.

  25. Leah says:

    Hi, i’m making sugar plum fairy cardigan. I’m having problems understanding this pattern:

    BACK: (i already have 34 dc here)

    Shape armholes, Inc row, 1sc in first dc, 2ch, 1 dc in the same dc as sc, [1dc in each dc] to last st; 2dc in 2nd ch. Cont in dc, inc in this way at each end of next row. 38sts. Fasten off.

    Next row Make 4ch, 2dc in first dc, [1dc in each dc] to last st, 2dc in 2nd ch, make 6ch. 40dc.

    Next row 1 dc in 4th ch from hook, 1dc in each of next 2ch, [1dc in each dc], 1dc in each of 4ch. 48sts.

    Cont in dc, work 5 rows. Fasten off.

    Can you translate this for me, please? Thanks…

  26. Leah says:

    Hi Rachel,

    Thank you so much! But after i’ve replaced the abbreviations, i’m still having problems…

    After the shaping of armholes inc. row which is 38sts. How come on my next row i can’t come up with only 40dc.

    Can you help me with this? Thanks again…

  27. Rachel says:

    Here’s the row after the armhole row…..”Next row Make 4ch, 2dc in first dc, [1dc in each dc] to last st, 2dc in 2nd ch, make 6ch. 40dc.”

    There are 2 more double crochets on this row compared to it’s previous row because of the “2dc in first dc” and the “2dc in 2nd ch”, both of these add an extra double crochet to the row, for a total of 2 additional double crochets.

  28. Leah says:

    Thank you so much Rachel… more power!!!

  29. Lavi says:

    Hi Rachel,

    I am making Baby Sweater and a beginner. Sweater made of 38 squares

    I am having trouble understanding these:

    Ch 4; join with sl st in first ch to form a ring

    Rnd 1: Ch 3 (counts as first dc here and throughout), 2 dc in ring, *ch 1, 3 dc in ring; rep from * 2 more times, ch 1; join with sl st in top of beg ch – 12 dc and 4 ch- 1 sps.

    Rnd 2: Sl st in each st to next ch- 1 sp, sl st in next ch- 1 sp, ch 3, (2 dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in same sp, *ch 1, ( 3dc, ch 2, 3 dc) in next ch – 1 sp; rep from * 2 more times, ch 1; join with sl st in top of be ch.

    This what I understand:
    Make 4 chains and join the 1st chain(hook?) with a slip stitch to form a ring.

    Round 1: Make 3 Chain stitches and 2 double crochets in ring.This where I am stuck. Does this mean ring is formed or I have to make ring.

    • Rachel says:

      Hey Lavi, to start you are going to make 4 chains and then insert your hook into the first chain that you made and make a slip stitch. This will make your ring.

      Round 1: you are correct with what you wrote. The ring is already formed from line above. You are not making another ring here. You are crocheting into the ring, meaning you stick your hook into the ring when you make your stitches.

      Let me know if that makes sense, and if you have more specific questions.

  30. April D says:

    Hi! I have been reading your helpful tips to others and am hoping you can decipher something that is making me nutty over here! :)

    I have directions for making the tail portion of a fish which says I need to:

    Rnd 29: (1sc) 2x, 1dc, (2tr), (1sc) 4x, 1dc, (2tr), (1sc) 2x (16)
    Rnd 30:(2sc), 1dc, (2tr) 2x, 1dc, (1sc) 4x, 1dc, (2tr) 2x, 1dc, (2sc) (20)

    Now the row prior, #28, has only 12 stiches. I’ve never come across the (2tr) so I’m wondering if I am adding two treble stiches into ONE stich or if I’m stacking them on top of each other? Either way though I can’t make the number of stiches equal 16 (or 20 in the next line) as per that ending phrase and wanted to know if another brain could just let me know what I’m not seeing or if maybe the number is off for these two rounds? It is my first attempt at an amigurumi fish using a pattern from a Barnes and Noble kit and it has gone very well until this part!

    Thanks for any help!!!

    • Rachel says:

      Hi April, 2 tr refers to make 2 treble crochets right next to each other, here is the tutorial for How to Crochet: Treble Crochet Stitches (tr) if you need it.

      Also, I hope your pattern isn’t actually written this way, because this would be one of the worst pattern writing that I’ve ever seen!! This definitely isn’t a conventional style for writing patterns. I can’t seem to figure out how the numbers add up either. Maybe the number are off?

  31. Debbie says:

    Hi there. I’m trying to branch out from crocheting blankets and am working on my very first (and easy) sweater.

    There are a couple questions I have about the directions for this pattern and am wondering if you can help.

    1) The pattern calls for 2 hook sizes but they only every mention the larger one when starting the project with the chain stitch. After that, the rows follow what they call a “Pattern Stitch”. The gauge for the project shows the ‘Pattern Stitch’ based on the smaller hook. Am I supposed to switch to that smaller hook when I get to that point in the project even though it never tells me to switch?

    2) When the “Pattern Stitch” is outlined, it states: “Pattern Stitch (multiple of 2)”. What does this mean? The project starts with chaining 110 then goes to the Pattern Stich which calls for SC in every other chain. This would cut the number of stitches in 1/2 from the total chain, right? But the pattern shows that I should end with 109; does the “multiple of 2″ note mean that I do 2 SC in every other chain?

    Thanks for any help you can provide!

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Debbie, I believe you are suppose to change to the smaller hook when you do the “pattern stitch” since that is what gauge uses.

      It states “multiples of 2″ just in case you need to alter the pattern (make it bigger or smaller), the multiple is how many chains you can increase or decrease the foundation chain by.

      If you are single crocheting in every other stitch, but are suppose to end with 109, I think there is something in the pattern stitch that you missing. Maybe there is a “chain 1″ between each single crochet?

  32. Debbie says:

    Thanks Rachel. There IS a chain stitch in between the SC’s. I wasn’t counting that as part of the total stitches!

    Thanks for your help. :)

  33. April D says:

    Rachel thanks. And yes, the pattern is written this way verbatim and it is making me nuts. This is my first real pattern reading and it had been going so well but I guess that’s what I get using one of those little “Creature Crochet” kits from a book store! I’ll just go with what’s written and hope that someone just messed up on the counts at the end! Thanks again and I love how many pictures you use to demonstrate stitches! It is so very helpful to learning some of these new stitches!!!

  34. Lavi says:

    Hi Rachel,

    Thanks for helping me in the Baby sweater, and i need ur help in the hat

    the pattern says:
    Rnd 2 Ch3, working in front loops only, dc in each dc around, join with sl st in top of beg ch.

    How to do front loop dc…can u help me ??..I donot know how to do front loop and front loop double crochet is confusing me…

  35. Nikki says:

    Hi Rachel,

    I just started crocheting and I have the beginnings of an afghan. I’m just stuck at this one spot in the pattern, It says this.

    Row 2: Dc in the next 12 dc, *in ch-2 sp work dc, ch 2, dc, (shell made);

    Okay, I did the Dc in the next 12 dc, no problem. But the next part, I’m just not getting no matter how much I research. I understand that it wanted me to do a double crochet in the chain 2 space of my previous row, which I did. But the ch 2, dc part…where does that go? If I make 2 chains next, where does that last dc go? Does it go in the chain 2 space or in the next dc?

    Thanks for any help, you have a great site.

    Nikki

  36. Nikki says:

    Thanks Rachel! I appreciate the help.

  37. Seira says:

    Hi! Im so glad I found a place to ask for help with a pattern! Im so stumped! (…im new to this…)

    When a pattern says: 2 dc in same st as turning ch, ch 1, sk 2 dc, sc in next dc

    The turning stitch is the stitch after the chains I just made right? I made 3 chains before I turned so it would be the 4th stitch? But..when you “sc in the next dc” does that mean crochet into the next chain or the hole made by the dc below? Thanks !!!

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Seira, yes, you make your stitches into the 4th stitch for the “2 sc in same st as turning chain” if your turning chain is 3 chains. When it says “sc in next dc” you will make your single crochet into the loops created by the next double crochet on the previous row.

  38. jan says:

    Hello, Thanks for the help. I am on the Row 3 of the Lacy Shawl pattern by Leisure Arts and I can’t figure out what its telling me to do. Here it is.
    Row #3- Ch 4, turn; (tr, ch3, sc) in next Cluster, ch3, work First leg of Cluster, *skip next sc, work (second Leg of Cluster, ch 3, sc) in next Cluster, ch 3, work First Leg of Cluster; repeat from * across to last sc, work Second Leg of Cluster in last sc: 56 Clusters and on tr. That’s it.
    I do know how to do the clusters because I did them on row 2. I just can’t figure out how to get started on row #3.
    Thanks for any help you can give me. Jan

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Jan, start off by chaining 4, then turning. Being that a cluster is a group of stitches that are joined together at the top, and that there should be a cluster on the previous row, you are suppose to (tr, ch 3, sc) into the stitch on the previous row that is at the top of the cluster you made. Then chain 3. Then work “First Leg of Cluster”, I’m not sure what this is, but it seems like it should be defined somewhere in the pattern as to what series of stitches this is referring to. After working that part of the pattern, repeat from the * until you reach the last single crochet. Then work the the “Second Leg of Cluster”, this should also be define somewhere in the pattern.

  39. Seira says:

    Thank You Rachel!
    I made a few rows to be sure, now I understand the pattern =)

  40. joann says:

    Hi Rachel:

    I’m a new crocheter, I don’t understand this part of the pattern please help, 1 sc in each of next 4 dc, draw up a loop in each of next 2 dc, yo & through all 3 loops for a dec, repeat from * around 50 sc

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Joann, this is telling you to make a single crochet into each of the next 4 stitches in the round, which happen to be double crochets you made on the previous round. Then you are going to make a decrease by inserting you hook into the next stitch, yarn over and pull the yarn through the stitch, then insert your hook into the next stitch and do the same thing. Now there should be 3 loops on your hook, so yarn over and pull the strand of yarn through all 3 loops on your hook.

      The * is telling you where to repeat from (there should be a beginning * and and ending *) and you will repeat the instructions within the 2 *’s until you reach the end of the round.

  41. joann says:

    Hi Rachel:

    Thanks for answering but after I do the yo & through all 3 loops for a dec, whats next do I only repeat the 1 sc in each dc to end of the row – or do I repeat the 1 sec— & repeat the yo & through all the way to the end of the row.

    And before I started this entire row it did not tell me to ch 3 – so do I just slip stitch and then start the 1 sec in each of next etc.

    • Rachel says:

      Joann, you repeat starting where the first * is. From what you copied, it doesn’t show the first *, so the information is not complete for me to tell you where to repeat from. Also, if it did not tell you to make a chain at the beginning, then do not make a chain at the beginning. If it doesn’t say to slip stitch then do not slip stitch either. Some patterns are worked in a spiral, where you just continue around without joining.

  42. labudd says:

    I am fairly new to crocheting. I have made a few things, like afghans and pillows, when I was younger. However, I bought a Bernat ball of yarn today, and wanted to make a baby blanket. It seemed to come back like it was yesterday, until I got to the following spot:

    Ch2. [(Yoh and draw up a loop. Yoh and draw through 2 loops on hook) 3times.Yoh and draw through all loops on hook - CL made. Ch 2] twice in next ch-3 sp.

    I have tried everything that I can think of to get this to work, and seem to be missing the point here. Your help would be greatly appreciated! Thank you so much.

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Labudd, I believe it is tying to tell you to make a cluster. To make your cluster in this pattern you will chain 2 then (yarn over, insert hook into the next stitch, yarn over, pull the strand of yarn though the stitch, yarn over , draw through 2 loops on hook) do the instructions with in the parenthesis 3 times, then yarn over and draw through all loops on hook (there should be 4 loops). Then chain 2. You are going to make 2 of these clusters in the next chain-3 space.

  43. Alexis says:

    I’m a complete beginner but I really wanted to make something so I started out with a ball. What does it mean when it says this:

    Rd 2: 2 sc in each st around (10)

    Rd 3: * Sc in next st, work 2 sc in next st, repeat from * around (15)

    Rd 4: * Sc in next 2 sts, work 2 sc in next st, repeat from * around (20)

    Rd 5: * Sc in next 3 sts, work 2 sc in next st, repeat from * around (25)

    Rd 6: * Sc in next 4 sts, work 2 sc in next st, repeat from * around (30)

    Thanks

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Alexis, just replace the abbreviations with the real words and it should read like plain English. Use this link to access the abbreviations and symbols: Crochet Abbreviations Also, the numbers in the ( ) tell you how many stitches you made in that round.

  44. Lisa - labudd says:

    I have came across a stitch that I do not know how to make. I have looked over your sight, and found the crochet index, however, I don’t see a place that it shows how to make a particular stitch. If there is one, would you kindly give me a link to it?

    Treble crochet – never heard of it before on this pattern. I would appreciate it if you could direct me to where I can learn how to do it.

    Thank you so much for all of your help. Thank you for being willing to help people do this.

    Lisa

  45. Lital says:

    Hi Rachel,
    I’m new in crocheting and I find your blog very helpful…
    I have a question: I’m trying to follow a pattern and there is a line saying: “Rnd 1: ch 2, 6 sc in second ch from hook; do not join, place marker” and then the second Rnd starts with making sc (this is very similar to the second example in your blog).
    my question is how does this (the first rnd) turns to be a round or how do I continue to the second rnd (since it doesn’t say to join or loop)? it just looks like a row at the end of the second rnd…
    thanks…

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Lital,

      When you do 6 sc in the second ch from your hook, you are making a very small circle. Because you are not joining at the end of the round, you begin the next round by single crocheting into the first single crochet you made on the first round. The next stitch you will crochet into will be the second stitch you made on the first round and so on.

  46. Scarlett says:

    What does single crochet in end mean? I have gone down the line and now need to do 3 SC in end.

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Scarlett, I’m not 100% sure, but it might be referring the the turning chain if there is one. If you can, I would ask the designer of the pattern, since each designer has his/her own writing style.

  47. Anna says:

    hi rachel, i’ve been busy lately have not been on your site for a while. i’ve been trying to make some berets for the young girls in my family. i seem to be doing something wrong because the 1st beret i did fits my niece…. she’s 2… the second will fit her next year.. ha ha. so i stopped until i had time to ask you what i was doing wrong . here’s the pattern..it’s from bernat… there are two versions… one with stripes if you wish to have a solid color beret simply omit ref to joining 2nd color in pattern.
    HELP … everybody keeps asking where’s my hat!
    w/ I-9 or 5.5 hook
    with
    MC. ch.6 join w/ sl st to form a ring
    1st rnd: ch 1. 12 sc in ring. join w/ sl st to first sc

    2nd rnd: ch 1. (1 sc in next sc. 2 sc in next sc) 6 times. join w/ sl st to first sc. 18 sc.

    3rd rnd: ch 1 (1sc in each of next 2 sc. 2 sc in next sc) 6 times. join A w/ sl st to first sc. do not break MC. 24 sc.

    4th rnd: With A, ch 1. (1 sc in each of the next 3 sc. 2 sc in next sc) 6 times. join w/ sl st to first sc, 30 sc.

    5th rnd: ch 1. (1 sc in each of next 4 sc. 2 sc in next sc) 6 times. join MC w/ sl st to first sc. Do not break A. 36 sc.
    last 4 rnds form stripe pattern.

    This is where i get confused and can’t seem to get the pattern right…

    keeping continuity of stripe pat (2 rnds of MC, 2 rnds of A), inc 6 sts in each rnd, as established to 120 sc and ending with 2 rnds of MC.

    next 2 rnds: with A, ch 1. 1 sc in each sc around join MC w/sl st to first sc at the end of 2nd rnd.

    next rnd: w/MC, ch 1. 1 sc in each of the first 18sc. draw up a loop in each of the next 2 sc. yoy and draw through all loops on hook. sc2 tog made. *1 sc in each of next 18 sc. sc2tog over next 2 sc. rep from *4 times more. join w/ sl st to first sc. 114 sts.
    next rnd: ch 1. * 1 sc in each of next 17 sts. Sc2tog over next 2 sts. Rep from * 5 times more. Join A w/ sl st to first sc. 108 sts.

    Next rnd: with A, ch 1. *1 sc in each of next 7 sts. Sc2tog over next 2 sts. Rep from * 11 times more. Join w/ sl st to first sc. 96 sts.

    Next rnd: ch 1. *1 sc in each of next 10 sts. Sc2tog over next 2 sts. rep from * 7 times more. join MC w/ sl st to first sc. 88 sts.

    Next rnd: w/ MC, ch 1. * 1 sc in each of next 9 sts. Sc2tog over next 2 sts rep from* 7 times more. join MC w/sl st to first sc. 80sts.

    Next rnd: ch 1. *1 sc in each of next 6 sts. Sc2tog over next 2 sts. Rep from * 9 times more. join A w/ sl st to first sc. 70 sts.

    Next rnd: w/ A ch1. *1 sc in each of next 5 sts. Sc2tog over next 2 sts. Rep from * 9 times more. join A w/ sl st to first sc. 60 sts.

    Next rnd: ch 1. *1 sc in each of next 8 sts. Sc2tog over next 2 sts. Rep from * 5 times more, join w/ MC sl st to first sc. 54 sts. Break A.

    Next 3 rnds: w/MC, ch1. 1 sc in each st around. Join w/ sl st to first sc. Fasten off

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Anna, did you check your guage if the pattern provided one? Also if the hat looks right, but it’s just too big, I would suggest using a smaller hook and measuring the hat as you go along. Once you notice that the hat is bigger than you like, take out a row or 2 until it is the size you want it, and then continue on with the pattern. you can also alter the pattern, so that the last few rows are tighter, by adding more decreases into the row.

  48. Anna says:

    wow, you got back fast but its not that its too big or too small its the directions wht the heck is it telling me to do here:
    keeping continuity of stripe pat (2 rnds of MC, 2 rnds of A), inc 6 sts in each rnd, as established to 120 sc and ending with 2 rnds of MC.
    inc 6 sts in each rnd…. what does that mean how do i do that? i think i’m suppose to go back and repeat rows 2,3,4,5 but how do i inc 6 sts in each rnd ????
    thanks for all your help your a crochet angel.

  49. Rachel says:

    Hi Anna, I see I forgot to answer that question!
    To increase by 6 stitches here is what the next few rounds would look like:
    Round 6: (1 sc in each of next 5 sc. 2 sc in next sc) 6 times
    Round 7: (1 sc in each of next 6 sc. 2 sc in next sc) 6 times
    Round 8: (1 sc in each of next 7 sc. 2 sc in next sc) 6 times
    Round 9: (1 sc in each of next 8 sc. 2 sc in next sc) 6 times
    etc.

    The pattern is that the number in the “1 sc in each of next _ sc” increases by one each time you do a new round. This is what makes it increase by 6 stitches. So you continue doing this until the total number of stitches in your round is 120. Also, don’t forget to sl st at the end of each round as you did in the previous rounds. I think that the pattern should have written out these lines for you.

  50. Anna says:

    thanks so much i’ll give it a go tonight or tomorrow…..anna