Three Special Stitches for Your Crocheting Arsenal

By Erin Burger – 21 Comments

A great way to add to your crocheting arsenal is to learn and implement special stitches. With special stitches you can make a plain scarf, blanket or washcloth more interesting and special. It’s easy to apply the instructions for a special stitch into your upcoming project.  Below are instructions for a few special stitches, some photos of the stitches and tips on using them in your project.  Check out the crochet abbreviation chart for help with abbreviations and symbols.

Moss Stitch

The Moss Stitch is the special stitch I use the most and the easiest of the three in this post.  It’s perfect for making baby blankets and is an excellent surface for adding appliques.
Moss StitchStart by chaining an even number of stitches.

Row 1: sc in 2nd ch from hook. * ch 1, skip next ch, sc in next ch, repeat from * across.

Row 2: ch 1, turn, skip first sc, * sc in next ch-1 space, ch 1, skip next sc, repeat from * across.

Repeat Row 2 until appropriate length is reached.

Chevron Stitch
A retro way of adding interest to a scarf is by using the chevron stitch.  This chevron is also perfect for stripes which really pop out when using this stitch.  See Changing Colors in Crochet for info on making great stripes.

Chevron Stitch

Start by chaining a multiple of 12 plus 3. (39 ch is perfect for a scarf, 111 ch for a lapghan)

(work in back loops throughout)

Row 1:  dc in 4th ch from hook, 1 dc in next 3 ch, (dc2tog over next 2 ch) two times, 1 dc in next 3 ch, 2 dc in next ch, *2 dc in next ch, 1 dc in next 3 ch, (dc2tog over next 2 ch) two times, 1 dc in next 3 ch, 2 dc in next ch, repeat from * across.

Row 2: ch 1, turn, 2 sc in first dc, 1 sc in next 3 dc, sc2tog two times, 1 sc in next 3 dc, 2 sc in next dc, *2 sc in next dc, 1 sc in next 3 dc, sc2tog two times, 1 sc in next 3 dc, 2 sc in next dc, repeat from * across.

Row 3: ch 3, turn, dc in first sc, 1 dc in next 3 sc, dc2tog two times, 1 dc in next 3 sc, 2 dc in next sc, *2 dc in next sc, 1 dc in next 3 sc, dc2tog two times, 1 dc in next 3 sc, 2 dc in next sc, repeat from * across.

Repeat Rows 2 and 3 until appropriate length is reached.

Smocking Stitch

The smocking stitch is a very vintage open work stitch that was used for…you guessed it…smocking garments!  A great application for the smocking stitch today is for washcloths/dishcloths and for lightweight scarfs.

Smocking Stitch

Start by chaining a multiple of 3 plus 3.

Row 1: dc in 4th ch from hook and in each ch across.

Row 2: ch 1, turn, sc in first dc, (ch 3, skip next 2 dc, sc in next dc) across to last 3sts, ch 3, skip next 2 dc, dc in 3rd ch of ch-3.

Row 3: ch 5, turn, sc in 2nd ch of ch-3, (ch 3, sc in 2nd ch of ch-3) across, ch 2, dc in last sc.

Row 4: ch 1, turn, sc in first dc, ch 3, (sc in 2nd ch of ch-3, ch 3) across, sc in 3rd ch of ch-5.

Row 5: ch 3, turn, (3 dc in 2nd ch of ch-3) across, dc in last sc.

Row 6: ch 3, turn, dc in 2nd dc, (ch 1, dc in first and second dc of group) across, ch 1, dc in 3rd ch of ch-3.

Row 7: ch 3, turn, dc in ch-1 sp, (dc in each next 2 dc, dc in ch-1 sp) across, dc in last dc, dc in 3rd ch of ch-3.

Repeat Rows 2-7 until appropriate length is reached.

If you have any questions or have any suggestions for other uses of the stitches, please don’t hesitate to comment!

Similar Posts

21 Comments

  1. Joanne says:

    Erin- great post- I will definitely be trying that moss stitch—and probably the others too!!!

  2. I love the moss stitch…so pretty!

  3. Grace says:

    Thanks for sharing these patterns. I love the Moss Stitch too! I am new to crochet. Have only been doing the basics, but I do like to experiment and try new stitches, so these will come in handy.

  4. Sandie says:

    I know the Moss Stitch by a different name – Seed Stitch, but it is a great, very versatile stitch that can be used for many different projects and gives a pretty, very warm finished item. A couple suggestions – if you are making a scrap project with this stitch and using different yarns, it works best if you use the same weight or thickness of yarn as if you do not it will show in your finished work, being wider or less wide at sections. (Yes, the voice of experience!) Also, use a hook that will give your stitch some pliability. Since this is a close worked stitch it might feel stiff if your hook is too small for your yarns.
    I’ve not tried that smocking stitch. Will have to give that a second look. Thanks, Rachel. You always have some interesting here.

  5. chitra says:

    These look amazing… can’t wait to try them out!

  6. Darlene says:

    Re error in smocking stitch pattern – did you realize that in row 4 you refer to working in 2nd chain stitch of row 3 and row 3 does not have a 3 chain, but only a chain 2?
    Row 3: “… (ch 2, sc in 2nd ch of ch-3) …”
    Row 4: “… (sc in 2nd ch of ch-3 …”

  7. Erin says:

    Hi Darlene,

    Good Eye! Thanks for the heads up.

  8. Erin says:

    I am going to have to make a baby blanket so I can try the Moss Stitch. :)

  9. alliandra says:

    the name of stitches are … so various
    for me, the first is the granit stitch (row 1 : SC / sk 1ch / ch 1 – rg 2 : SC in the ch1-sp / ch1 / sk SC

    and the seed stitch is: (SC-DC) in the same stitch sk 1 ch and the next row the same thing (SC-DC) but in the DC only and sk the SC …

    and what about griddle stitch? ( row 1 SC / DC – row 2 : SC in the DC and DC in the SC) it’s easy and pretty too
    but my favorite is the granit(or moss) stitch

  10. [...] a previous post I gave instructions for three special stitches, the moss stich, the chevron stitch and the smocking stitch, which all help add texture and [...]

  11. SoSaje says:

    Gotta say, I think the moss is my new favorite! Worked up a baby blanket in no time – and it’s so light and soft!! Thank you for this wonderful tutorial. :-)

  12. Hi Erin.
    I have a question about the chevron stitch. Did I read correctly that you alternate rows of single crochet and double crochet once the pattern has been set up?

    I know the standard ripple pattern is just one kind of stitch, usually double crochet in my experience.
    Thanks!

    Jeannie
    ( who is going to the Taos Wool Festival this weekend!)

  13. Dana says:

    I am working on a blanket using the Moss Stitch, I really like the look of my work. I think this is going to be one of my best blankets yet. I have always used the granny square or just the double crochet stitch to make blankets. Thanks Erin for displaying the different stitches. I will be trying some of the others at a later date.

  14. [...] started, this is the Chevron Stitch: (the instructions for the chevron stitch can be found here: Three Special Stitches for Your Crocheting Arsenal) In order to complete a successful chevron pattern you have to have the correct number of starting [...]

  15. [...] third installment of Stitches for Your Crocheting Arsenal (check out Part 1 and Part 2 for even more special stitches!) contains the instructions for two more special [...]

  16. Cheryl Davis says:

    Erin~ I’d like to try the moss stitch for a washcloth first. If I’m using worsted weight cotton, can you recommend a hook size that will give the stitch a little sturdiness but not be too rigid?
    Thanks for the great tutorials!
    Cheryl

  17. Erin says:

    Hi again Cheryl,

    I would use an H hook in that case, and I hook might give you a little bit more of a give though. I would start with the H and change over to the I if it’s too rigid. The H and the I are the two sizes I use most.

    -Erin

  18. Donn says:

    Hello,

    I just found your website and love it. I learned to crochet when I was little from my grandmother and was to young to understand the abbreviations or follow a pattern and have always just free-formed my designs with just the basic stitches: single, double, treble and shell. I have found your tutorials very helpful and look to expand my stitch arsenal. I want to start with the chevron stitch but have a question on it

    Row 1: dc in 4th ch from hook, 1 dc in next 3 ch, (dc2tog over next 2 ch) does the dc2tog mean double crochet 2 stitches in the same chain?

    Thank you

Leave a Reply