Posts Tagged ‘design’

How to Start Your Own Crochet Guild

Posted in Tutorials and Help on September 7th, 2010 by Emilee Gettle – 5 Comments

Years ago crafting as a group was a way of life. Women gathered from rural areas to share gossip, laughter and tears while creating something useful together. They made gifts for family, quilts to raffle, and in wartimes needed items for servicemen. It encouraged creativity and gave these ladies an excuse to slow down and do something with their hands other than cleaning or preparing the next meal. These quilting bees or sewing circles were the highlight of the week as old friends gathered and new friends were made. It’s a great thing to reinstate if you don’t have a fiber arts guild in your area. Here are a few pointers on how to get one started! read more »

Jumpstart a Crocheted Christmas

Posted in Best Crochet Patterns, Tutorials and Help on September 4th, 2010 by Emilee Gettle – 3 Comments

During the holidays I love to give handmade gifts. I think it adds a sentiment that our society as a whole has devalued in the past. Something from the store new and shiny definitely has appeal. Whatever that item might be, it will grow old in time and it will need to be replaced. However, the afghan from Grandma is priceless and is still in use years later! Something handmade is like a hug from a loved one. You can put your heart and soul into this gift. Hand crocheted presents can boast something that no other store bought gift can and that is love… straight from the heart! read more »

What was Your First Crochet Project?

Posted in Fun Ramblings on September 1st, 2010 by Emilee Gettle – 43 Comments

I remember as a young child watching my grandmother crochet. I was simply in awe how she could turn a ball of yarn into a toy, scarf or other creation in no time flat! I remember receiving crocheted gifts from her and my mother. Even as a young child I knew this was one skill I had to learn; a tradition to continue in my family.

In my teens, I joined 4-H and my mother became the crochet teacher of our small group. My first project was a washcloth. At first I couldn’t figure out how Mom made it look so easy. My washcloth was a sorry representation compared to her’s! Yet, because of her patient encouragement I finally was able to create something I could be proud of. It took me several years to put it to use. I grew so attached to my first project dirty dishwater seemed to be an injustice!

What was your first crochet project?

Collecting Vintage Crochet Patterns

Posted in Fun Ramblings on August 17th, 2010 by Emilee Gettle – 13 Comments

I have a secret love for vintage patterns. I can spot them aisles away in flea markets and antique stores. Their creased covers and penciled in notations from years ago give them such a sweet, homey appeal. I not only love the patterns, some of which are elegant and others rather funky, but also the fun illustrations throughout.

I can spend hours flipping through their dogeared pages laughing at the crocheted bikinis and cooing over the sweet baby layettes. It just goes to prove that crochet has kept the hands of women busy for many years turning a skein of yarn into innovative pieces of functional art, and at times funny finished projects.

Do you collect vintage patterns? If so, what is the most absurd or elegant pattern you’ve found?

A Crochet Designer Uses Lace Patterns in Pottery

Posted in News on June 30th, 2010 by Alicia Kachmar – 6 Comments
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Photo by H. Scott Hoffmann/News & Record

Maggie Weldon learned to crochet at an early age, the craft quickly turning into an escape for her. It gradually developed into a full-fledged business of patterns, books and even crochet supplies, all based in North Carolina. Somehow Weldon found the time to take a pottery class with her daughter, and the creative juices, rooted in crochet, began to flow. Upon working in slabs, versus on the wheel which she didn’t take to, she took crochet doilies and linens, and stamps them into the wet clay.

Weldon became quite hooked on these crochet-inspired ceramic designs and decided to pursue it more seriously as part of her art repertoire, saying, “I push the envelope and try to make the biggest pieces I can.” One of those pieces is a 28-inch wedding cake plate! For delicate lace pieces that may be disintegrating, imprinting them onto clay may be a way to at least preserve their patterns in the long run. And who wouldn’t want a set of table linens AND all place settings to be crochet-related?!

More about Maggie Weldon can be found here.