How to Crochet: Foundation Single Crochet (fsc)

By Rachel Choi – 84 Comments

The foundation single crochet (fsc) is a stitch that can replace the foundation chain and the first row of single crochets in your work by completing them at the same time! This is also known as chain free crocheting!!!

But what’s the point?

  • Often times crochet foundation chains are tighter than the rest of the work, but with fsc it will have the same tension without having to use a larger hook.
  • With some yarns (such as boucle) it is hard to see the stitches in a traditional foundation chain, but with fsc you don’t have to crochet on a chain.
  • Even if you prefer making a traditional foundation chain. You can use fsc to add extra stitches to your work without having to take the whole thing apart if you accidentally miss count the number of chains.
  • It’s faster if you do it right! Being able to complete a chain and a row of single crochets at one time can save you time.

Here is a picture tutorial for making the foundation single crochet. This tutorial is for both right and left handed people. For left handed pictures, roll your mouse over the image and it will change for you.

Step 1: Start with a slip knot on your hook and chain 2.





Step 2: Insert your hook into the second chain from your hook (which is also the first chain that was made)



Step 3: yarn over (wrap the yarn around your hook)



Step 4: pull the strand of yarn though one loop on your hook (you should now have 2 loops on your hook)



Step 5: yarn over (wrap the yarn around your hook)



Step 6: pull the strand of yarn though one loop on your hook (you should now have 2 loops on your hook) Note that you just completed the chain portion of the stitch.



Step 7: yarn over (wrap the yarn around your hook)



Step 8: pull the strand of yarn though the final 2 loops on your hook (you should now have 1 loop on your hook) Note that you just completed the single crochet portion of the stitch.



There you have it, your first foundation single crochet stitch! Take a good look at it, the chain is on the bottom and the single crochet is on top of it. This is important to see for knowing where to insert your hook next. Here is how to add more stitches:

Step 9: Insert your hook under the 2 loops of the “chain” portion that was made in the previous stitch. It should seem like your hook is between the chain and the single crochet. It may be easier to see where to insert your hook if you hold your work sideways or upside down.




Repeat steps 3 – 8 to complete the stitch. You can make a row as long as you desire. This will replace the foundation chain and first row of single crochets in a piece of work.

Here is what a row of fsc looks like!




If you need help with making a foundation single crochet, let me know and I’ll love to help!

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84 Comments

  1. Lila says:

    I am working on a patern that is the traditional foundation chain that is joined the a first row of half double and continues in a tube how would you join the Fsc or Fhdc to stich a tube like for fingerless gloves. Thanks

    • Rachel Choi says:

      Hi Lila, you can work the fhdc until you reach the number that you need. Then on the last fhdc, make a slip stitch into the bottom of the first fhdc you make, then work the fhdc, then make another slip stitch into the top of the first fhdc.

  2. Collette Griffith says:

    When a pattern calls for “chain 124. Then dc in fourth chain from hook…” do you fdc 121? The pattern has no multiple listed.

  3. Liz says:

    Rachel,
    I was working on a pattern that is worked in multiples of 5. I like using chainless foundation. the pattern called for ch 100, in 4th ch from hook dc, this counted as the 1st 2 dc sts… It did not look right. Question… can I do chainless foundation st to 96, ch 4 & put that dc st in the 96th chainless foundation stitch?? Thanking you in advance for your attention to this inquiry and any help you may give me.
    Liz Gonzalez
    [email protected]

    • Rachel Choi says:

      Hi Liz,
      If the beginning ch counts as a stitch you would do 100 – 3 + 1 = 98 fdc (the one extra fdc would replace the chain that counts as a dc)
      I’m not sure what your second row is, but if it starts with a ch 3 and it counts/acts as a dc, you would skip the first fdc.

  4. Liz says:

    Rachel,
    THANK YOU SO MUCH!!! Now I’m going see if I can make that work for me…
    Happily hooking in South Jersey :-)
    Liz

  5. patbrum says:

    Thank you very much for this, I have been crocheting for 60 years and did not know this until I found your site. I saw several and yours was so clear to follow.
    Thank You.

  6. tina says:

    I’ve already made a tank top for my daughter and the original chain is too tight on her rib cage. is there a way to remove/replace the chain without undoing everything? I started from the chain and went up, switched colors and went back to the chain and went down ( so it’s a 2 part tank with the chain in the middle). If you have any solutions I would be in your debt

    • Rachel Choi says:

      Hi Tina, sorry I don’t think there’s a way to redo the chain without undoing it. If there was a way, I wish I knew too!

    • Candace says:

      You could undo the slipknot and pick out each chain, but it would be pretty tedious. You would also need another piece of yarn or something like a circular knitting needle or a crochet hook on a flexible cable to hold your stitches until you work them back into the rest of your project.

  7. jayu says:

    thank you, thank you so very much!
    i have been a knitter all my life and only ventured into crocheting last year… my 66th!
    now because of your so helpful tutorial, i shall go forth and multiply— those foundation stitches.
    and maybe tackle bigger projects, which i used to look at enviously.
    so happy to have met you thru your blog.

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