How to Crochet: Block Edging

By Robin Beers – 28 Comments
This pretty edging is called block edging because the stitches look like little blocks. Use this as a decorative edge on doilies or cuffs or even crocheted jewelry. It is pretty simple once you get the hang of it. It uses the Triple crochet (tr), also known as treble crochet. For a refresher on this stitch, see How to Crochet: Treble Crochet


Start with a row of single crochet. In this tutorial, I am using crochet thread size 3 with a D crochet hook.

Note: If you are left handed, just put your mouse over the photo for a left-handed view.


Chain 3.


Skip first 3 stitches. Make a tr (triple crochet) in the next stitch.


Chain 3.


Make 4 triple crochet (tr) around stem of previous triple crochet (tr).


Now you have a total of 5 triple crochet made.

Your first block is now complete. Skip 3 stitches and repeat.

If you have any questions, don’t hesitate to ask.

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28 Comments

  1. cowgrlw says:

    Thanks, Robin! I love learning all these new (new for me, anyway) stitches and patterns from all the Crochet Spot ladies!! : D

    Wendy

  2. Allison says:

    I love it! Thank you for sharing this project.

  3. Robin says:

    You’re very welcome!

  4. Kelly Rachel says:

    This is fantastic. I do have a question for you!
    I once saw a pattern that looked like block edging in rows…with the blocks going in alternating directions. Does that make sense? Do you know what I’m talking about (because I don’t think I do :D ) and what it’s called? Thanks for your help!

  5. Robin says:

    Hi Kelly Rachel,
    I know what you are talking about. It would simply be a continuation of the pattern but instead of skipping your single crochets along the edging, you would go from one block to the next in each row. I may do it for a new tutorial for you if you’d like. I’m not sure what it is called but I will look into it. :)

  6. Karen says:

    I just wanted to say thank you for your tutorials! I am a relatively new crocheter, last 2 years,so your site has helped me immensely. I have a better understanding of the stitches because of your site. Your step by step pictures are what helped me. It makes it easier to understand what the stitch should look like when you have the words as well as the picture to back it up. So thank you, thank you, thank you!!! You have a wonderful site!

  7. Natalie says:

    Looks great! I will have to try it out on one of my many projects one of these days.

  8. diana says:

    hi Kelly Rachel, love this beautiful edging and love the cotton that is used. wish that i could get all the beautiful crochet cotton and yarn in my country. Thank you for your crochet site.

  9. Charlie says:

    Really like this edgeing. Will give this one a try. Always looking for something a bit different for the finished edge. Don’t like all the fringe hanging on.lol
    Many thanks for sharing.

  10. Jerriann says:

    Is there any way to reverse this stitch? I am edging a ripple afghan and want the stitch to be normal going up the first side of a ripple and then a shell at the point and then reverse the stitch going back down the other side of the ripple. Please advise as to how this can be accomplished, thanks.

  11. Robin says:

    My best advice for you, Jeriann, would be to start the stitch at the alternate end of the afghan to make it look reversed. Hope this helps. :)

  12. Erica says:

    How do you finish this off? I’m using this edging around a flannel baby blanket (I LOVE it, btw) and want to know how to finish it once I get all the way around the blanket?

  13. Celina says:

    Is it okay to substitute “4 tr around the stem of prev tr” with “4 dc around the stem of prev tr” ??

  14. Robin says:

    I really, really like this edging!!

    Is there a way of doing this into the open boxes of the filet pattern without having to make the entire border first?

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Robin, sure you can crochet the border evenly around your item. Just follow the steps in the tutorial. The photos show the border being done on a row of stitches, but you can do the border on the side of your item.

  15. Shirley says:

    Robin, this is beautiful edging. I am making a crocheted baby afghan. How would you do the corners? Thanks a lot for the free pattern. :)

  16. Lori Munson says:

    I would love to do this edging around a pr of pillow cases putting my first row of sc base directly into the case material. Can you tell me if that row should end in an even or odd number of sc.
    Really love your patterns and the tutorials are top notch. Thanks for your help with my dilemna.

    • Rachel says:

      Hi Lori, the number of single crochets you’ll need should be a multiple of 4, since the “skip 3 stitches, tr in next stitch” uses up 4 stitches. So if you take the total number of single crochets you make and divide it by 4 and get an whole number, you should be good to go!

      • Lori Munson says:

        WOW thanks for a fast response…I am anxious to get them started and will get them going tonight after dinner. Thanks again Rachel.

  17. Dana says:

    I tried the same ratio on a smaller scale using two chains and double crochet instead of 3 chains and treble crochets and spaced them leaving 2 stitches unworked instead of three and it works completely well but is ….daintier for lack of a better word

  18. Sarah says:

    Thank you so much for your tutorials! Im new at crocheting, having taught myself by book and youtube. Your directions are so clear and easily followed. Thank you again!

  19. Beverly Bilbrey says:

    How many stitches.do you chain to start

    • Rachel Choi says:

      Hi Beverly, you can chain any multiple of 4. So that’s 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, 24, etc. This beginning chain wouldn’t include the chain 3 that’s at the very beginning so you would have to add that.

  20. Caro says:

    Hi there…thanks for lovely pattern…can you tell me how to do a corner using this pattern. Thanks so much. =)

  21. Liz says:

    Thank you so much for this post, just used it on a baby blanket and it looks wonderful! Looking forward to finding more ideas from you!

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